A new flood alleviation scheme has been welcomed by a Sheffield community which has experienced severe flooding in the past.

Residents at the bottom of High Street in Mosborough have suffered with flooding due to a damaged culvert near their properties.

And now, works are underway to replace the culvert with a new pipeline, in what is one of the first schemes to take place in Sheffield’s £56m wider investment in flood and drainage infrastructure.

Councillor Terry Fox, cabinet member for environment and transport at Sheffield City Council, said: “I am very pleased to see that the work to replace this culvert is underway, and hope that the works will provide some peace of mind for local residents and businesses.

“More widely, of course, this is a very important step forward for Sheffield’s flood alleviation programme as a whole.

“As we saw in 2007, flooding devastates communities and can ruin homes and businesses. We as a council are absolutely determined to do all we can to ensure that flooding on this scale never happens again in our city.”

Julie Greaves owns one of the homes affected by the flooding, and has added her support to the scheme.

She said: “This is a complete relief. It’s been a long process and I’m so glad this work is taking place.

“I really am grateful that everyone has taken the time to get this done.”

Six flood alleviation schemes are currently in the pipeline for Sheffield, some of which are in progress and some of which are getting underway soon.

These are a £19m project in the Lower Don Valley, which has commenced construction; a £12.4m flood alleviation scheme for the River Sheaf and Porter Brook; a £11.9m flood alleviation scheme in the Upper Don, including the rivers Loxley and Little Don; an £8.2m culvert renewal programme on watercourses across the city; a £2.6m environmental scheme to manage flooding and surface water from planned developments on the Manor and Arbourthorne estates; and a £2m flood alleviation scheme on the upper Blackburn Brook, which would benefit homes and businesses in Chapeltown and Ecclesfield.

This is one of the very largest commitments to tackling flooding from any council in the country, and will reduce flood risk to around 6,000 households and 2,000 businesses – as well as protecting land for new development and clearing the way to support the building of new homes across Sheffield.

Coun Fox added: “Over the next 50 years, around 6,000 households and 2,000 businesses in our city will be at risk of flooding due to climate change, so we have to get ready now.

“This flooding could come at an economic cost of £1bn to Sheffield, as well as proving catastrophic for residents and businesses.

“That’s why I’m so pleased we are pressing ahead with these schemes. We will do, and are doing, our very best to protect Sheffield from flooding, now and into the future.”

Subject to scheme details being approved by the Environment Agency, who are closely supporting the council with council with this work, the full programme will be completed by 2021.

So far, the £19m for the construction of the Lower Don Valley project has been secured. A further £23m of funding has been registered on the Government’s national programme, to fund the design and build stage of the work, but is still pending full approval. Additional funding is set to come from partner investors.

As well as helping to protect properties from flooding, the schemes will also contribute to the regeneration of Sheffield’s waterways, and protect and enhance the environment.